sadlynostalgic:

when in doubt mumble


She thinks running is like getting drunk in reverse. With drinking, it feels great at first, but then you start feeling awful. With running, you feel awful first, but then, after you finish, you feel great.
Running With The Kenyans- Adharanand Finn (via 1500m—runner)

(via vibinbrainwaves)


In football, you might get your bell rung, but you go in with the expectation that you might get hurt, and you hope to win and come out unscathed. As a distance runner, you know you’re going to get your bell rung. Distance runners are experts at pain, discomfort, and fear. You’re not coming away feeling good. It’s a matter of how much pain you can deal with on those days. It’s not a strategy. It’s just a callusing of the mind and body to deal with discomfort. Any serious runner bounces back. That’s the nature of their game. Taking pain.
Chris Lear - Running with the Buffaloes (via adistancerunner)

(via pinetreesandcalfsleeves)


☆ Beatles playlist ☆ 
❀ http://8tracks.com/ummmhannah/beatlemania

☆ Beatles playlist ☆
http://8tracks.com/ummmhannah/beatlemania


sadlynostalgic:

why aren’t funerals called saderals




shesarunnerrebel:

I am so impressed.

shesarunnerrebel:

I am so impressed.

(via timelordressmysweetiejenny)


jtotheizzoe:

I Ran A Marathon… For Science

This week’s It’s Okay To Be Smart was five months in the making, folks. It was a labor of love, full of blood, sweat, pain and joy. I ran a marathon, for science.

I’ve enjoyed running for as long as I can remember. I’m weird like that. Whether it was on the soccer field or on the road, I just love the peace and pleasure that comes with moving my legs.

But even then, I never understood how human beings were physically able to run a marathon. “26.2 miles?! HA!" I used to think.

I figured the best way to find out was to just do it! This video tells the story.

In the process, I learned how evolution molded our bodies into running machines, how our ancestors first stood up and took off on the hunt, how we fuel our long-distance endurance engines with amazingly efficient cellular ATP factories, what it means to “hit the wall”, and how freaking amazing the Achilles tendon is (perhaps nature’s finest kinetic/potential energy conversion device).

But by far, the most important thing I learned is that our bodies are capable of amazing feats, and just like the evolutionary journey that got us here, you’ve gotta go through a little pain and adaptation to get where you’re going. Luckily I had thousands of you pushing me up every hill!

Hope you enjoy this one, it was a special video to make.

Consider subscribing to It’s Okay To Be Smart on YouTube so you don’t miss an episode! 

(via bulk-me-up)


"They took to the line. Smiles disappeared to be replaced by looks of concentration. Elbows came out where seconds before tidings of good luck had been murmured between the athletes.

The gun went off.

The only thing that mattered was the eight women on the track and a clock counting upwards - a clock determining who would leave a champion and who would leave just another name to skim by in the race results”


solidindecision:

Pre liked to come out hard and stay up front during races. The strategy sometimes came back to hurt him, but more often than not, it lead to moments like this, where Pre just left his competitors in the dust.

solidindecision:

Pre liked to come out hard and stay up front during races. The strategy sometimes came back to hurt him, but more often than not, it lead to moments like this, where Pre just left his competitors in the dust.

(via justrunandhideitaway)



The best conversations are held during long runs. When judging doesn’t happen and we are beaten down to only voices and the human spirit. These conversations are always personal and deep and real. Because on the run, we become ourselves; perhaps the truest to ourselves we have ever been.

When I’m out on that track, stadium lights shining on me, the crowd’s shouting drifting into oblivion, my heart beating like a drum, I feel powerful. When rain pours onto my exhausted body during a workout with 9 400s left, I feel strong. When the sun beats down on my body during the hardest run of my life, I feel humbled. Running is the only thing that has made me feel powerful, strong, and yet humbled all at the same time. And maybe that’s why I love it so much.

But sometimes no matter how much you will your legs to go, to move faster, they just won’t. That’s why I’ve always liked running. It’s like life.
Jordan Hasay, Runner (via avengetherun)

(via spikesandspeed)